Trouble for Biden: Comms Aide Has Long History of Sexist Tweets

Does Joe Biden’s campaign even bother checking the Twitter history of the people it hires?

It’s a legitimate question. One week after a new Biden hire was found to have recently tweeted about how police officers were worse than pigs, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee’s head of strategic communications was revealed to have a long history of misogynistic tweets.

According to Fox News, Kamau M. Marshall has a history of sexist tweets dating back to 2011 and continuing up to 2015.

He also used anti-gay language and rationalized the rape charges against Bill Cosby by saying that police officers who had shot black men hadn’t been indicted.

While Fox News had previously broken the news that supervising videographer Sara Pearl had a recent history of derogatory tweets toward police officers, Pearl isn’t a senior staffer. Marshall is, having been hired in April 2019 — and his history of tweets might be even more disturbing.

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WARNING: The following quotes contain graphic language that some viewers will find offensive.

On Christmas Eve of 2011, Fox News reported earlier this week, Marshall tweeted, “Even though I like power women…I need her to know her place…meaning I [wear] the #pants…iight.”

Less than a month later: “Are all women crazy???? Lol no offense ijs [I’m just saying].”

And then we get into double entendre, again in 2012: “Nice guys finish last because they make sure their girl comes first.”

Should Biden’s campaign remark on these discoveries?

Get it? Oh ho ho.

Also 2012: “I disagree – I try not look at __ or impress __ Personally speaking-I enjoy the challenge & I only look & talk to CLASSY Women.”

In 2013: “It’s unattractive when a girl doesn’t act classy & does not know how to control her feelings.”

Marshall has told “sour, angry women” to “Keep your distance…Don’t take it out on the next man.”

He’s said, “As long as my woman looks good & turns me on..she pretty much can have whatever she wants from me.”

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Marshall was also fond of the phrase “no homo.” For those who don’t remember this delightful bit of linguistic detritus, which has mostly passed out of our argot, it was usually added to a statement that might, if read a certain way, imply the reader was gay. But seriously, they weren’t!

Here’s one deployment of it by Marshall: “Wood wakes everybody up…no homo but to many memories #hazing is bad smdh lmao.”

My assumption is there’s not much lmaoing over that one this week within the Biden camp, but that’s just me.

Then there were his tweets regarding Cosby when the sexual assault allegations began to pile up against the comedian and actor. After his 2015 arrangement, Marshall wrote, “It’s not a coincidence that Cosby can be arraigned on allegations, yet countless police officers who gun down black bodies aren’t indicted.”

A few minutes later, apparently quoting someone: “This is not about whether or not Cosby is innocent, b/c that [I don’t know]. Yet, this is about a strategic agenda that is pervasive & unrelenting.”

As was the case with Pearl’s tweets about the police, the campaign didn’t comment. Also as was the case with the Pearl tweets, they were quickly deleted.

The difference is that Pearl’s tweets — in which she denigrated police and called for defunding — took place just a month before she was hired by the campaign.

Pearl, however, is a minor cog in the Biden machine. No, she shouldn’t have been hired. It shouldn’t have been a surprise, however, that someone of the left would have this kind of disrespect for the police.

Marshall is different. This is a top Biden staffer who got the job despite posting these tweets and neither apologizing for them nor scrubbing his social media history. They didn’t care, why should he?

And yes, some of this is mild even by today’s standards. That said, from any other source it would bring down the fires of wrath upon the Twitterer, because everything must be judged by the mores of the moment — which are the only ones that have ever been operative, whether during the Middle Ages or just a few years ago.

Also, some of them definitely aren’t mild — and that’s the point.

In an interview last year with PR Week, Marshall said this: “In all honesty, I don’t have a regrettable career moment. It hasn’t been perfect, but it hasn’t been bad either. If anything, I would say I had some great teachable moments where I’ve learned and gotten better. Also, I’m still getting better with time.”

I wonder if this breaks that string of no regrettable career moments, or whether it will end up qualifying as very, very teachable.

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