College Fires Security Guard After Liberal Mob Demands He Pay for Justified Shooting from 1994

Officials at a university in New Jersey are apparently retroactively enforcing social justice by terminating a security guard who justifiably shot and killed a knife-wielding criminal a quarter-century ago.

Peter Amico, who headed Rowan University’s security team until he was let go on Monday, is the kind of guy you’d want around to protect campus safety amid an increasingly dangerous world and political environment.

Amico, according to reports, has real-world law enforcement experience and was trained to handle dangerous situations, including dealing with violent people who threaten public safety.

The Courier-Post reported that in 1994, Amico shot and killed a 14-year-old in the community of Glassboro, New Jersey.

Tragic, sure, but the teen was reportedly charging him with a knife, so Amico, who was then a 29-year-old police officer, made a split-second decision and fired on the teen.

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While the former officer was cleared of any wrongdoing in the incident in which he might have saved his own life and the lives of others, the action he took is now apparently problematic as anti-police sentiment runs rampant across the country.

The teen, who was identified by the Courier-Post as El Tarmaine Sanders, was black, and Amico is white.

PhillyVoice reported that the teen was chasing a cousin around with a knife when his mother phoned police during the ’94 incident.

Amico arrived on the scene and neutralized the threat by firing his weapon.

Do you think Americans will continue to stand by quietly as leftist mobs obscure the lines between right and wrong?

At that time, quick thinking by a law enforcement officer to save innocent life was viewed favorably.

Amico was given a Combat Cross award by the Gloucester County Police Awards Committee for “combat with an armed assailant.”

But as history is being rewritten before our eyes, Amico is now the bad guy, whereas the knife-wielding teen will apparently enjoy martyrdom.

Sanders died, and Amico went on to continue serving public safety — until a leftist mob pushing anti-police rhetoric got ahold of the story.

Sanders’ mother, 26 years after her son’s death as he charged an armed officer with a knife, joined the anti-police movement, apparently, and her anger led to the petition to remove Amico from his job at the school.

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A Change.org petition calling for Amico’s ouster accused him of being “’proud’ to accept a racist Combat Cross Award given by Gloucester County police organizations for killing Eltarmine Sanders.”

The petition received more than 3,500 signatures, with one supporter of Amico’s firing making an eloquent argument for why she felt the security officer should be fired.

“F— THE POLICE,” wrote petition signer Makayla Lepofsky.

PhillyVoice reported that Rowan University president Ali Houshmand caved to the demand from the mob petitioners and fired Amico over the 26-year-old incident.

“Given the circumstances of Amico’s employment prior to serving at the university and the necessarily painstaking evaluation of Rowan’s institutional commitment to racial justice and equity, Amico’s employment will be discontinued,” Houshmand said of giving Amico his walking papers.

A mob started a petition to rid the school of an apparent hero, and now that hero is unemployed, and students on campus will in all likelihood be less safe without his experience and presence.

The left is out for blood, and the institutions in our country, such as Rowan University, are either in agreement with the leftists, or they are rolling over and caving to their demands.

In either event, justice was not served for Amico, and apparently revenge for perceived racial injustice is now driving another institution that is supposed to promote higher learning and critical thinking.

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